Mike Pompeo Fumes Over Fox News Host’s Question On Trump’s Foreign Intel Remarks

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Ragú Pasta Sauces Recall: Some jars may contain plastic fragments

The owner of Ragú is recalling some of its jars of pasta sauce over the possibility that they may contain plastic fragments, the company said.

Mizkan America said Saturday it has no reports of injuries or complaints, and was launching the recall voluntarily “out of an abundance of caution.”

The affected products are:

  • 45-ounce chunky tomato, garlic & onion, with a June 6, 2020, best-by date
  • 66-ounce chunky tomato, garlic & onion, with a June 5, 2020, best-by date
  • 66-ounce chunky tomato, garlic & onion, with a June 6, 2020, best-by date
  • 66-ounce old world style traditional, with a June 4, 2020, best-by date
  • 66-ounce old world style meat, with a June 5, 2020, best-by date

The sauces, produced earlier this month, were distributed nationally, the company said.

“Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be discarded or returned to the place of purchase for a refund,” Publix grocery store chain said in its own announcement.

Customers can also contact Mizkan America for a replacement coupon and to have any sauces picked up for further examination, the company said.

Mizkan America of Mt. Prospect, Illinois, is a subsidiary of the Handa, Japan-based food company, Mizkan, which specializes in vinegars, sauces, mustards and dressings. Mizkan Group purchased Ragú and Bertolli in 2014 for $2.15 billion.

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4 people found dead in an Iowa house with apparent gunshot wounds, police say

DES MOINES, Iowa — Four people were found dead inside their West Des Moines, Iowa, home, police said on Saturday. All four had apparent gunshot wounds.

Chandrasekhar Sunkara, 44; Lavanya Sunkara, 41; and two boys, ages 15 and 10 were pronounced dead at the scene, the city of West Des Moines said in a news release. They were found Saturday morning, according to CNN affiliate KCCI.

Four other family members, two of whom are children, were staying in the home as guests, police said. When the victims were found, one of those guests ran outside to look for help, found someone walking by and had that person call 911.

Police identified apparent gunshot wounds to each of the victims, but autopsies will be performed to determine the cause of each of their deaths, the release said. A police spokesman said there does not appear to be a threat to others in the community.

“This tragedy will impact family, friends, co-workers, anyone that knew this family,” said Sgt. Dan Wade with the West Des Moines Police Department. “We are continuing to work through this investigation. We will follow through until we have answered as many questions as the evidence allows.”

Meghan and Harry release new photo of Archie for Father’s Day

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have released a new image of their son, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, in honor of Father’s Day.

The photo, which appeared on the royal couple’s official Instagram page, features Archie clutching Prince Harry’s finger. “Wishing a very special first Father’s Day to The Duke of Sussex,” the post states.

The couple also posted a photo in May in honor of Mother’s Day in the many countries across the globe that celebrate it, including Meghan’s native America.

“Paying tribute to all mothers today — past, present, mothers-to-be, and those lost but forever remembered,” the post stated, “We honor and celebrate each and every one of you.”

The photos are the only times that Archie has been seen since he was presented to the world in St. George’s Hall in Windsor Castle only days after his birth on May 6.

New details have just emerged about Archie’s christening, which is set to take place at St. George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle in July, according to The Sunday Times.

Richard Fitzwilliams, a royal expert, told CNN that the christening will almost certainly take place at the chapel as it is where Harry was christened in 1984, and where he and Meghan tied the knot in May 2018.

More recently, the chapel has played host to the weddings of Prince Andrew’s daughter Princess Eugenie to Jack Brooksbank in October 2018, and Lady Gabriella Windsor to financier Thomas Kingston in May 2019.

Fitzwilliams noted that the christening will be a “highly significant” event, as Archie is the first royal baby born to parents of different ethnicities. He noted that the christening will highlight a “changing royal family which reflects society as a whole in modern Britain as in the Commonwealth more closely.”

Yet despite Meghan’s push for modernity, which has included championing women’s rights, the christening is expected to be a traditional affair, Fitzwilliams added.

Archie will reportedly be baptized with water from the River Jordan, which holds particular significance for the Jewish and Christian faiths, as it is believed to be where Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist.

The paper added that the royal baby will also be dressed in an exact replica of the historic royal christening gown, which was commissioned by Queen Victoria and first used in 1841 for the baptism of her eldest daughter, Princess Victoria.

The original, which was made from Spitalfields silk and Honiton lace, was worn by 62 royal babies, including Queen Elizabeth at her christening in 1926, Prince Harry and Prince William.

A replica of the gown was commissioned by the Queen in 2004, however, as the original was deemed too fragile for further use. The most recent royal babies to don the replica were Prince George in 2013 and Princess Charlotte in 2015.

The christening will also feature the Lily Font, a silver-gilt receptacle which was commissioned by Queen Victoria in 1840, the Sunday Times added.

The font, which is stored at the Tower of London when not in use, has been used for the christenings of all of the Queen’s children and grandchildren, excluding Princess Eugenie.

Fitzwilliams noted that royal christenings are often small and private affairs, which are attended by “senior royals, family, close friends and the godparents and their spouses.”

The Queen is nevertheless expected to be absent at the celebrations due to prior engagements, according to the newspaper. While the monarch attended the christenings of Prince George and Princess Charlotte in recent years, she was noticeably absent from Prince Louis’s baptism last year.

The ceremony is expected to be conducted by the Dean of Windsor, The Right Reverend David Conner, and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, who is head of the Church of England.

Conner has recently conducted the marriage ceremonies of Meghan and Harry, Princess Eugenie and Lady Gabriella Windsor.

ABC’s George Stephanopoulos Hammers Trump On Mueller Report: ‘Did You Read’ It?

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Deputies shoot crime-spree suspect in Allegan County

allegan sheriff

ALLEGAN COUNTY, Mich. — A man is hospitalized after a two-day crime spree that ended with him being shot by Allegan County deputies Sunday morning.

According to Allegan County sheriff Frank Baker, at 7 p.m. Saturday sheriff’s deputies responded to a report of a stolen vehicle in the Martin area and suspect information was developed by investigating deputies.

Later in the night, the suspect abandoned that vehicle and stole another vehicle from the Wayland area. The suspect crashed this vehicle in the Hopkins area.

Deputies attempted a canine track, but were unsuccessful in locating the suspect.

At 7 a.m. Sunday, the suspect carjacked another vehicle while armed with an assault rifle. The suspect was reported to be in the area of 128th Avenue and 56th Street in Manlius Township in northwest Allegan County and was shooting at houses.

The suspect then entered a residence and held the occupants at gunpoint while he attempted to steal another vehicle.

Deputies confronted the suspect as he was attempting to leave the residence in a vehicle. The suspect refused to obey commands and was heading back into the house when deputies engaged the suspect with gunfire.

The suspect was wounded and was transported to the hospital with injuries.

No deputies were injured.

The investigation is continuing by the Allegan County Sheriff’s Office.

New York Times: US ramping up cyber attacks on Russia

The US is escalating cyber attacks on Russia’s electric power grid and has placed potentially crippling malware inside the Russian system, The New York Times reported Saturday.

The placement of the malware that deep within the Russian grid had never previously been attempted, the Times reports, and is intended partly as a warning and also to put the US in a position to conduct cyber attacks should a significant conflict arise with Russia.

Two administration officials told the Times they believed President Donald Trump had not been briefed in any detail about the US computer code being implanted inside the Russian grid.

Pentagon and intelligence officials describe to the Times “broad hesitation” to tell Trump about the details of the operations against Russia. They tell the Times there was concern over how Trump would react, and the possibility that Trump might reverse the operations or discuss it with foreign officials.

Trump said in a string of tweets Saturday evening that the Times report was “NOT TRUE,” calling the Times’ reporting “a virtual act of Treason” and the news media the “enemy of the people.”

“Do you believe that the Failing New York Times just did a story stating that the United States is substantially increasing Cyber Attacks on Russia. This is a virtual act of Treason by a once great paper so desperate for a story, any story, even if bad for our Country…..” Trump said in one of the tweets.

The Times responded to Trump’s tweet, pointing out its note in the story that they had spoken to national security officials who had no national security concerns about their reporting.

In 2017, Trump shared highly classified information with the Russian foreign minister and Russian ambassador to the US in a White House meeting, The Washington Post first reported and CNN later confirmed.

In interviews with current and former government officials over the past three months with the Times, officials describe the deployment of US computer code into Russia’s grid and other targets as part of a shift to a more offensive strategy.

The incursion into the Russian electric power grid seems to have been conducted under new legal authorities in the military authorization bill passed by Congress last year, the Times reports. Under the law, the defense secretary can authorize, without special presidential approval, routine “clandestine military activity” in cyberspace, according to the Times.

Trump issued new authorities last summer to the United States Cyber Command, which is part of the Pentagon and runs the US military’s defensive and offensive online operations, the Times reports. The classified document gives the commander of Cyber Command, Gen. Paul Nakasone, the power to conduct offensive online operations without needing presidential approval.

The Trump administration declined to describe to the Times specific actions it was taking under these new authorities.

Current and former officials tell the Times the US has put reconnaissance probes into the Russian grid since at least 2012.

Nakasone and White House national security adviser John Bolton declined, through spokesmen, to answer questions from the Times about the incursions, and the White House did not respond to CNN’s request for comment.

Officials at the National Security Council declined to comment to the Times, but said they had no national security concerns about the details of the Times’ reporting.

Judge dies after suffering a heart attack on the bench

PUTNAM COUNTY, NY — A judge in upstate New York died after suffering a heart attack in his courtroom.

Putnam County Court Judge James Reitz had just finished a case on the bench Friday morning when he asked a court officer for help.

“They were getting ready to call the next case when Reitz said to the court officer that was with him, ‘John, I think I need you to help me here,’” Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell told CNN.

Reitz then collapsed. The officer performed CPR on the judge until he was taken by ambulance to the hospital, Odell said. The hospital worked on him for about 30 to 45 minutes before he was pronounced dead. He was 57.

Reitz had been a judge in Putnam County since 2007, according to the New York Law Journal. Before that, he was a lawyer with a private practice.

Reitz was known for his drug court program, which offered people whose crimes were related to addiction an opportunity to seek treatment and avoid prison.

Terrence Murphy, a former New York state senator, told CNN he worked with Reitz often on the drug court. Murphy was chair of the New York State Senate Task Force on Heroin and Opioid Addiction.

“He ran the best drug court in New York state,” Murphy said. “He literally saved people’s lives. He’s an iconic person and will be sorely missed. Our professional relationship went beyond, into personal friendship, with him and his wife Barbara. I’m still in shock.”

Odell said the death of Reitz was a loss to the community.

“He was a giant among men in this community. We will be feeling his loss for a very long time,” Odell said. “I personally lost a dear friend and Putnam County lost a dedicated public servant whose passion was helping anyone who needed help.”

Trump says he didn’t fire Mueller because firings ‘didn’t work out too well’ for Nixon

President Donald Trump said that he didn’t fire special counsel Robert Mueller because firings “didn’t work out too well” for former President Richard Nixon, though he claimed he had the Constitutional authority to do so.

“I wasn’t going to fire (Mueller). You know why? Because I watched Richard Nixon go around firing everybody, and that didn’t work out too well,” Trump said in an interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos that aired Sunday.

Trump appeared to be referring to the “Saturday Night Massacre,” in which Nixon, on October 20, 1973, ordered the firing of Archibald Cox as special prosecutor in the Watergate investigation. Rather than comply with the order, Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus resigned. Cox was eventually fired by Solicitor General Robert Bork.

Trump insisted in the interview that he had the authority to fire Mueller — had he decided to do so — from Article II of the Constitution, telling Stephanopoulos that “Article II allows me to do whatever I want. Article II would’ve allowed me to fire him.”

Article II of the US Constitution lays out the President’s duties and powers including his abilities as commander in chief of the military, as well as the procedure to elect and remove a sitting president. In his report, Mueller acknowledged that the Constitution gives Trump, “unique and powerful means of influencing official proceedings, subordinate officers, and potential witnesses.”

In letters to the special counsel, Trump’s lawyers argued that Article II essentially shielded Trump from even being investigated for taking actions that he is legally allowed to. This includes removing the FBI director, like he did with then-Director James Comey in May 2017.

Mueller resoundingly rejected this argument when Trump’s lawyers tried to make it. The Mueller report notes that the Constitution doesn’t give Trump unlimited powers, and specifically does not grant him the ability to skirt federal investigations and potential accountability from Congress.

Trump also spoke in the interview about Trump Tower Moscow, calling it more of a “concept” than a deal.

“I didn’t even do a deal in Moscow,” Trump told Stephanopoulos, who pressed the President on the deal, saying he was pursuing one.

Trump replied: “Excuse me. Pursuing, what does pursuing mean? Do you know that I don’t even think they had a site? I don’t even think they knew who was gonna do the deal. It was a concept of a deal, more of a concept than anything else. It was a concept of a deal someplace in Russia, probably in Moscow, and I was looking at places all over the world.”

Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen is currently serving a three-year prison sentence in part for a conviction of lying to Congress about the Trump Tower Moscow project. And last week, the President’s son, Donald Trump Jr., testified to Congress about the project, saying that he didn’t pay close attention to it because it was one of many potential deals that had been in the works, according to a source close to Trump Jr.

Cohen led efforts during the 2016 presidential campaign to build a Trump project in Moscow, and even sought help from the Kremlin, according to the Mueller report. The project didn’t happen. Trump said during the campaign that he has no interests in Russia and didn’t acknowledge the failed Moscow effort until he was in office.

Prince Harry Shares Adorable New Photo Of Baby Archie On First Father’s Day

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